disturbingly-average:

i am 99.999% sure that literally everyone knows steve irwin is australian

disturbingly-average:

i am 99.999% sure that literally everyone knows steve irwin is australian

(via sketch-bag)


(via sketch-bag)


the-fault-in-our-youtubers:

the internet summed up in one gif set

(via frafeeccino)


dogfang:

A horse walks into a bar. The bartender says “Why the long face?” The horse says “I’ve just realized I’m a metaphysical concept within a fictional narrative, and will cease to exist at the end of this sentence.”

(via sketch-bag)


musicaldailydose:

Antonin Dvorak - Slavonic Dances No. 7

Born near Prague in Austrian-controlled Bohemia, Dvorak was a Czech nationalist composer in the same vein as Bedrich Smetana before him.  Drawing from the folk music of Bohemia and Moravia, he became one of the most renown composers of the Romantic era.  This was most apparent in his well-known Slavonic Dances.  Commissioned by his publisher in response to Brahms’ popular Hungarian Dances, Dvorak wrote the first set of these in 1878 (Opus 46), with a follow-up in 1886 (Opus 72).  Originally written as four-handed piano compositions, he later released full orchestral versions of the work as well, as heard in today’s piece, the seventh dance of the first opus.

Enjoy!


musicaldailydose:

Antonin Dvorak - Slavonic Dances No. 7

Born near Prague in Austrian-controlled Bohemia, Dvorak was a Czech nationalist composer in the same vein as Bedrich Smetana before him.  Drawing from the folk music of Bohemia and Moravia, he became one of the most renown composers of the Romantic era.  This was most apparent in his well-known Slavonic Dances.  Commissioned by his publisher in response to Brahms’ popular Hungarian Dances, Dvorak wrote the first set of these in 1878 (Opus 46), with a follow-up in 1886 (Opus 72).  Originally written as four-handed piano compositions, he later released full orchestral versions of the work as well, as heard in today’s piece, the seventh dance of the first opus.

Enjoy!


thenob:

Today is the birthday of Swiss composer Joseph Joachim Raff, so in a bit of a departure from my usual fare (and certainly  the NOB’s), I’d like to offer up his first Cello Concerto (1874) for today’s listening. I’m not a Raff connoisseur by any means, but I have a particular fondness for this piece. I hope you’ll enjoy it!  - Melinda Beasi

Joseph Joachim Raff: Cello Concerto No. 1 in D minor, Op. 193
Daniel Müller-Schott, cello
Bamberger Symphoniker
Hans Stadlmaier, conductor


timespaceandmusicinyourface:

THIS FUCKING PUN

timespaceandmusicinyourface:

THIS FUCKING PUN



emperornorton47:

Overture to The Wasps by Ralph Vaughan Williams
Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
conducted by C. Seaman